What if I was ordered to get an Ignition Interlock Device by the court and the DMV?


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There are two ways an ignition interlock device can be imposed on you: either a court ordered ignition interlock device or a DMV ordered ignition interlock device. No matter which one orders you to install the ignition interlock device, you’ll be in steady contact with the DMV because the DMV registers your information once you are required to install the ignition interlock device. If they do not receive a notice that you have installed it the DMV will flag your license so that authorities know you are driving without a license.

If you have been convicted of a DUI in the state of California, you will likely have to have an ignition interlock device installed. If it is your first DUI you will have to install an ignition interlock device if the DUI was received in Alameda, Los Angeles, Sacramento, and Tulare. Once you are convicted you will have to have an ignition interlock device installed by an authorized retailer. You will also have to provide the court with proof of your installation through an authorized dealer. The court will then monitor your ignition interlock device reports that are provided by the authorized ignition interlock company.

The DMV will be informed by the court that you must install an ignition interlock device. Once you have installed the ignition interlock device the DMV will place a mark on your record, informing law enforcement of the ignition interlock device requirement in the event you are pulled over. The DMV will also place a restriction on your driver’s license that could limit to you to only driving to and from work. If at any point you are failing to comply with the court-ordered ignition interlock device restriction, the court will alert the DMV and they will suspend your license until the entire situation is sorted out. You could be without your driving privileges for the extent of your DUI probation.

The DMV is required to enforce any ignition interlock device requirement ordered by the court. You will be required to communicate the installation of your ignition interlock device with the DMV, and then you will also be responsible for keeping your ignition interlock device in good working condition and regularly calibrated. For a DMV-ordered ignition interlock device restriction you will have 30 days from the mail date of the order of installment to either submit verification of installation, or the ignition interlock device exemption form.

If you are ordered to install an ignition interlock device by either the court or the DMV you will want to stay in constant contact with them to be sure you are completing everything as necessary. It is very important that you get the ignition interlock device installed within the allotted time, and that you keep up with the calibrations. If you do not follow the necessary steps you may find yourself with a suspended license, and that will be tougher to get back. A restricted license can be frustrating, and so can the ignition interlock device, but it will be worth it to have your license back, at least in some capacity. It will also help prevent you from drinking and driving again.

FRESNO DUI CHECKPOINT

Fresno police department arrested nine individuals for suspicion of drunk driving on June 21st and June 22nd. They also impounded 32 vehicles because the drivers did not have a license present, or they were on the nine individuals that were arrested for drunk driving. The DUI saturation patrol was located in the southeast policing district. One drunk driving suspect who was arrested is a repeat DUI offender.

This DUI saturation patrol had 11 extra duty officers and was funded by a grant from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. In 2010, Fresno was granted $132,171 for DUI checkpoints and saturation patrols in an effort to keep roadways safe. The funds are used for checkpoints, surveillance and apprehension, and targeting those who fail to appear at DUI related court dates.

Visalia Sting – Offenders caught driving with a suspended license

An undercover operation conducted by the Visalia Police Department resulted in the arrest of one previous DUI offender who was driving with a suspended license. The operation was designed specifically to locate drivers who were continuing to drive on suspended licenses directly related to DUI arrests. Ten individuals were identified at the Visalia courthouse as being specifically told by a judge not to drive. Undercover officers then followed those ten people into the parking lot to see if they drove away from the courthouse.

All but one of the individuals with suspended licenses has alternate forms of transportation for their drive home. Crystal Carrasco, 34 years old of Visalia, California, was immediately arrested for driving with a suspended license. Visalia police plan to continue this sting operation as a way to find individuals who are driving with suspended licenses.

What to do after ignition interlock device installation

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What do I need to do after I’ve had an IID installed? Do I need to inform the DMV?

If you have been convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol, and now must install an ignition interlock device there are several things you should know about the installation process. First, once you are convicted, if an ignition interlock device needs to be installed, the court will notify the DMV. The reason for this is two-fold. First, the DMV will mark your record so that police officers are aware of the requirement, in the event you get pulled over. Second, if you do not get your ignition interlock device installed the DMV can suspend your driving privileges until you have installed the ignition interlock device.

The DMV is required to impose driving and license restrictions on those convicted of a DWI and have the ability to suspend your driver’s license until you can prove you have had the ignition interlock device installed. Within 30 days of the installment order you must submit either Department of Motor Vehicles Ordered Verification form, or the Exemption for Ignition Interlock Device form. The ignition interlock will assist you as you try to get your life back in order, following your DWI conviction. The ignition interlock device will help prevent you from driving under the influence again by testing your breath for evidence of alcohol before allowing you to start your vehicle. An ignition interlock device can only be installed in instances where the driver was driving under the influence of alcohol.

An ignition interlock device installed in your vehicle can also help shorten your license suspension if you have been convicted of a second or subsequent DWI. In order to qualify for this you would need to complete the following: install an ignition interlock device in your vehicle, and provide the DMV with “Verification of Installation” Ignition Interlock form, clear all other suspensions on your record, comply with a DWI program’s requirements and submit proof to the DMV, submit proof of insurance, and pay all fees. If you have received your second DWI your license suspension will last 90 days, and then you’ll be required use an ignition interlock device each time you drive. If you have been convicted of a third or subsequent DWI your license suspension will last at least 6 months.

Being convicted of a DWI is never an ideal situation, but there are ways for you to improve the situation for yourself. An ignition interlock device is especially helpful through this process because it allows you to regain your driving privileges. An ignition interlock device will also help prevent you from driving under the influence of alcohol in the future by testing your breath for alcohol each time you start your vehicle. Everyone makes mistakes, and an ignition interlock device allows you to learn from your mistakes and not make the same poor decisions again. It is important for you to stay up to date with your ignition interlock device service, and stay informed on all laws that may affect your future, and your driving privileges.

What happens if someone driving my car has been arrested for DWI?

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What will happen if someone driving my car has been arrested for DWI?

If someone other than yourself is driving your vehicle, and gets arrested for a DWI you may have concerns that it will somehow impact you and your ability to drive. A DWI comes with penalties like jail time, probation, large fines, alcohol education courses, or mandatory installation of an ignition interlock device If this situation presents itself, you will not be affected, assuming there is no evidence that you had knowledge of the other driver’s intoxication. You cannot be punished because another person got behind the wheel of your car drunk. The driver of the vehicle, not you, the owner of the car, will be the only one face the consequences of the actions.

You may face some penalties if your car has been seized, and you have to get it out of impound. You will want to do this quickly, so as to avoid the expensive daily penalties that are accrued at an impound lot. If your car was impounded you can contact the police department that arrested the driver of your vehicle to get the information on where your car is currently located. None of this will have an effect on your personal record, it will only have an effect on your personal wallet.

Additionally, if the driver is involved in an accident while using your car you could face a civil charges. This is especially true if the person who is driving your car, is an alternative driver in your vehicle on a regular basis. Also, if your vehicle was involved in an accident you insurance rates could go up, even if you weren’t involved in the crash. This can happen if your insurance company has to pay for any damages, either to your car or the other car involved in any crash.

Conversely, if you had knowledge of the other person driving drunk in your vehicle you could face very serious penalties. These penalties could include charges like reckless endangerment. You could also face civil charges, if a victim believes that you contributed to the accident involving your friend driving your car. Negligence is determined on a case-by-case basis, but the only way to avoid the negligence charge is to not allow any person who is under the influence of drugs or alcohol to operate your vehicle.

It is very unlikely that you will face penalties if someone else gets a DWI while driving your car, however you could face consequences if they are involved in an accident or if you knew they were driving while intoxicated. Your potential penalties can range from simply paying to get your car out of the impound lot, your insurance rates rising, or at the very worst negligence and reckless endangerment for allowing someone to drive your car while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. It is important that you know and trust any person whom you let behind the wheel of your vehicle, not just to protect yourself, but to protect the lives of others on the road.

Can someone else use my car if it has an ignition interlock device unit installed?

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If you get a DWI you will be required to install an ignition interlock device in your vehicle, and use the ignition interlock device every time you start your vehicle. The ignition interlock device will be used to prohibit you from starting your car if you have been drinking. If you have an ignition interlock device installed in your car you can still allow others to drive your vehicle, they just have to use the ignition interlock device before the car will start. Any legally licensed driver can operate your vehicle while the ignition interlock device is installed in your vehicle.

Before the car can be started the driver will be required to blow into the ignition interlock device so that a measurement of the driver’s breath alcohol concentration can be taken. The ignition interlock device will have predetermined limits for the driver’s breath alcohol concentration. These predetermined limits are set by the state of New York. As long as the driver’s breath alcohol concentration levels are not over those predetermined limits when they blow into the ignition interlock device they will be allowed to start the car.

The steps for using the ignition interlock device are very easy, but you should be sure that each driver understands how the test will be completed before they blow into the ignition interlock device. Any person who uses your vehicle should also know that there is a rolling retest that will take place 5 to 15 minutes after the first test.

The driver will have time to respond to each retest, and pull over if they feel that’s safer for them, before retesting their breath alcohol concentration. The retests will continue to happen periodically through the rest of your drive. The driver is required to complete all retests, and if a retest is not completed a violation will be registered in the ignition interlock device log. Some devices may also sound an alarm, such as making the horn honk, or flashing the headlights, and these alarm would draw attention to your vehicle.

The purpose of these retests is to make sure the driver is not providing a false test at any point. If the retest is failed by you or another driver the car will not immediately stop, as that would be a hazard to traffic and other drivers. Instead, the ignition interlock device will log a violation in the monthly report. As the registered user of the ignition interlock device you will be responsible for any and all positive tests that show up in the monthly log for your ignition interlock device. If you are having someone else blow into the ignition interlock device so that you may start your car, you and your passenger should know that the state of New York has laws that impose fines or jail time on those who are trying to circumvent the proper usage of an ignition interlock device.

Ignition interlock devices and mouthwash

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My unit is saying there is alcohol in my system but all I did was use mouthwash. Ignition interlock devices use fuel cell technology to detect alcohol on your breath. While these devices are supposed to detect if you have been drinking alcohol, there are certain things that can set them off, even if you have not been drinking. Anything with alcohol content can be detected by the ignition interlock device. That means your ignition interlock device could potentially detect mouthwash, perfume, cologne, after-shave, or hairspray. In the event you register a false positive because of mouthwash, your best course of action is to wait until the ignition interlock device allows you to test again, and then retest, and not get a positive test result.

It is especially likely that your ignition interlock device would detect mouthwash because the alcohol from the mouthwash is on your breath. Also, many of the mouthwash products contain up to 30% alcohol, that’s the equivalent of some vodkas, whiskeys and rums, so you can understand why the ignition interlock device might confuse it for an actual alcoholic drink. It is strongly encouraged that you use alcohol free mouthwash while you have the ignition interlock device installed in your vehicle. If you prefer to continue using mouthwash that contains alcohol there are a few precautions for you to take.

The alcohol in mouthwash begins to dissipate within 15 minutes, and if you rinse your mouth with water it will go even faster, as the water will help rinse the alcohol out of your mouth, which is what the ignition interlock device is reading. We recommend that every user of an ignition interlock device rinse his or her mouth with water before every test they submit through the ignition interlock device. This will not necessarily conceal the use of alcohol but it will help get the most realistic test result on the ignition interlock device.

As the registered user of the ignition interlock device you will be responsible for every test result that is registered on your device. In the event that a false positive is registered because you had used mouthwash, or for any other reason it may affect your driving privileges. When it is available you should breathe into the ignition interlock device again, and hopefully it registers a .00. If this happens, it will likely be determined that it was a false positive. However, if you breathe into the ignition interlock device again and it still reads as alcohol on your breath, you may be in trouble.

Your safest way to avoid a false positive from mouthwash on your ignition interlock device is to use non-alcohol mouthwash for the time being. It’s best for you to avoid any and all issues with your ignition interlock device because your driving privileges depend on it. If you decide to keep using mouthwash with alcohol just be sure you are not using the mouthwash near the time you will need to breathe into your ignition interlock device, or wait at least 15 minutes to breathe into the ignition interlock device.

Can an ignition interlock device detect marijuana?

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Frequently, people who have ignition interlock devices installed in their vehicles have questions about what can and cannot be done with an ignition interlock device, and what exactly the ignition interlock device does. One question that comes up a lot is, ‘Does my ignition interlock device detect marijuana?’ The answer is no. At this time ignition interlock devices can only detect alcohol on your breath. Ignition interlock devices are alcohol specific, meaning they can only detect alcohol. This is also true for breathalyzers used by police officers. However, there is a roadside test that is used to detect the presence of marijuana in a person’s saliva.

Ignition interlock devices have come a long way since they were sensor cell devices. Most ignition interlock devices are now fuel cell devices. These new fuel cell devices allow the ignition interlock device to eliminate false readings from the presence of cigarette smoke, tobacco, or possibly spicy foods, among other substances that provided ‘false positive’ results on tests. In the past ignition interlock devices have been faulty, and things like chewing tobacco would provide false positives. Now that they run on fuel cell technology many of those faulty false positive readings have been eliminated. While they have come a long way, the ignition interlock devices are still not equipped to detect anything on your breath, other than alcohol.

While an ignition interlock device does not detect the presence of marijuana in your system, you should know that it is still illegal for you to drive under the influence of any substance, and this includes marijuana. If you have a DWI and are pulled over and police find marijuana in your system this will affect your probation, and all parts of your DWI conviction. It could be, and likely will be, considered a second offense, and punishments for second offenses are even more stringent.

Just because the ignition interlock device does not detect marijuana does not mean you should get behind the wheel if you have been smoking. The new roadside test can detect even minor amounts of marijuana in your saliva, and if you have a DWI you do not want to be caught driving under the influence again. Another thing to remember is that many times smoking marijuana comes hand-in-hand with drinking, especially in social settings. Your ignition interlock device is not equipped to detect marijuana on your breath, but it will still detect any and all alcohol on your breath, and could prevent you from starting your vehicle.

Currently, ignition interlock devices are unable to detect marijuana, and are only equipped to detect alcohol that may be on your breath. You should not, however, get behind the wheel of a car if you have been smoking marijuana. Driving under the influence of marijuana is still considered a DWI, and you cannot say you thought you were okay to drive because your ignition interlock device allowed you to start your vehicle. Ignition interlock devices are not equipped to detect marijuana, and it will still be considered illegal if an officer pulls you over and tests you for marijuana.

How does the ignition interlock device work?

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The ignition interlock device prevents you from starting your vehicle if you have been drinking. Before you are able to start your vehicle you will have to breathe into your ignition interlock device. The ignition interlock device will use fuel cell technology to analyze your breath, and determine whether or not you have alcohol on your breath, and if it is over the predetermined levels that are allowed. If the ignition interlock device registers a positive test result, meaning you have consumed too much alcohol, your vehicle will not start. The ignition interlock device will be connected to your car’s ignition and will not allow your car to start if there is alcohol on your breath.

Once you have started your vehicle you will be required to participate in rolling retests throughout your drive. The first retest usually occurs within five minutes of you starting the car. These rolling retests are performed the same way the initial test is performed. You will breathe into the ignition interlock device and it will analyze your breath for alcohol. After that there will be rolling retests periodically, during your drive. If you pass the initial test, but fail a rolling retest your car will not just stop in the middle of the road. Instead the ignition interlock device will log the positive test result. Some ignition interlock devices will force the car to start flashing headlights, and set off your car alarm to get you to pull over.

To keep your ignition interlock device in good, working condition you will need to get it calibrated periodically. It is recommended that you get your ignition interlock device re-calibrated every sixty days to ensure accuracy and proper function. The ignition interlock device will alert you when it is in need of service, or if there is an error by a flashing light on the unit, or a sounding tone. If the unit goes unserviced for too long it may lock you out of starting your vehicle, thus forcing you to have your car towed to the installation facility for servicing.

The ignition interlock device is easy to use, and is proven at helping prevent repeat DWIs. You do not have to be convicted of a DWI to have on installed in your vehicle. You can also voluntarily install one in your vehicle to prevent you or someone else who uses your vehicle from driving under the influence of alcohol. At this time ignition interlock devices only detect the presence of alcohol, so it will not detect drugs like marijuana, although that is still considered driving under the influence.

Diet soda and alcohol

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Are you the person who usually orders a low calorie cocktail at happy hour with friends? Well a recent study may change your mind on mixing alcoholic beverages with diet sodas. No one likes to talk about scientific studies, but this one makes an interesting point. In the test three groups were given different drinks: vodka and regular soda, vodka and diet soda, and a placebo that contained neither. Each participant was given three drinks a piece and then asked to answer some questions about their perceived sobriety.

Those who were given the vodka and regular soda had a BAC level of .077, and the participants who had the vodka and diet soda had a BAC of .091. That’s 18 percent higher than the regular soda drinkers. Another interesting note is the diet soda drinkers did not report that they felt any more intoxicated than those who were drinking the regular soda. They also showed slower reaction times. The fact that they did not feel drunk could put them at risk of drinking and driving at dangerously high levels of intoxication.

The study focused on the effects of regular soda and diet soda on rates of alcohol absorption in the body. The study showed that the artificial sweeteners in diet sodas transports the alcohol from the stomach to the bloodstream much quicker than regular sodas. This is also connected to the calorie count in regular sodas. Because regular sodas have sugar, and sugar equals calories, your stomach takes longer to digest the soda, and in turn takes longer to digest the alcohol. The artificial sweeteners in diet soda are not recognized as calories by the stomach, so they go straight into the blood stream instead of getting digested. That means that if the diet soda is mixed with alcohol, the alcohol is getting into the blood stream much faster.

Because the artificial sweeteners rush the alcohol into your blood stream, but the drinker doesn’t necessarily feel it, it could mean an increased chance for getting a DWI. Those who drank the diet drinks were less likely to realize they were intoxicated, and would probably be more likely to get behind the wheel after drinking, making them more likely to get a DWI. A DWI will change your life forever, and not in a positive way. A DWI will be on your record permanently. You’ll also have to deal with the repercussions of your probation, including fines and alcohol awareness classes. Another consequence might be the mandatory installation of an ignition interlock device in your car. The ignition interlock device prevents you from driving drunk by making you breathe into the ignition interlock device before you are able to start your car. The ignition interlock device can be mandatory for months to years after your DWI conviction, depending on your individual circumstance.

If you’re a diet soda drinker, you may want to reconsider drinking it with alcohol. Find other ways to trim calories when you’re at happy hour, or consider finding a designated driver. No one wants to deal with the effects of a DWI, like probation, fines, and ignition interlock devices, so be sure you find a safe way home if you have been drinking.